Mesick Consolidated Schools asking for bond renewal in November

Voters in Mesick have in recent years turned down several bond proposals to pay for improvements at the school district but the bond renewal coming up in November is the operational millage, which comprises around 20% of their overall budget.

MESICK — Mesick Consolidated Schools has an 18-mill millage renewal on the upcoming November ballot ... not to be confused with a new bond proposal.

Voters in Mesick have in recent years turned down several bond proposals to pay for improvements at the school district but the renewal coming up Nov. 5 is the operational millage, which comprises around 20% of their overall budget.

This millage has been renewed by voters in five elections since 1996.

The maximum 18 mills that will be levied for the 2019-2020 school year was comprised of the original mills approved in August 2014. After that, the funding will disappear if the millage is not renewed.

According to the district, the tax is on non-homestead property and does not apply to primary places of residence.

Non-homestead property generally includes industrial, commercial, and second homes and is taxed at 12 to 24 mills (6 mills base plus 6 to 18 mills, which requires voter approval).

The revenue generated from the 18 mills totals around $1.3 million annually.

“If this millage does not pass, the state will not replace the funding and Mesick Consolidated Schools will be forced to reduce or cut programs to offset the loss,‘ said Superintendent Scott Akom.

The district reported that this renewal will have little effect on current taxes. For a business property with a taxable value of $200,000, the tax would cost $3,600.

Akom said any residents who have questions regarding the millage are free to contact him at (231) 885-2727 or akoms@mesick.org.

Despite their importance, there have been instances in the past when voters did not approve the operational millage. This happened in the southwest Michigan town of Saugatuck in 2009.

Although the school eventually passed the levy in a special election, thousands of dollars were lost as a result of the district taking out a loan to pay bills, in addition to the cost of convincing the public to support the millage the millage.

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